Blue's Cup

Saturday, May 01, 2010

Drink to my health, my lovely
'Tis a well seasoned cup, you see, We'll dance to forgetfulness, this evening,
And sing praises to the gods, to be free.

Drink to my health, my lovely
'Tis a well poisoned broth, before ye We'll have one more toast, to the queen,
And then it's off with your head, for tea

Drink to your health, my corpse body
The wine goes down into the sea,
Go through the clock at midnight,
And arrive at the seashore with me

Drink to their health, my good friends
'They are vampires, blood is their swill Beware these ever-thirsty creatures
Haven't life left inside them to fill

Drink to our health, my enemies
'Tis time to throw down the brawl, Violence breeds death and blood spilling
Corpses, body parts fall

Drinks can get stale, sitting here
with no one to drink them but me
unfinished to-do lists be damned,
they're zombies that never are free

The cup has turned blue with the waiting
sitting patiently, filled with thick broth,
leaves of carbon fibre, with messages,
the colour of candle and moth

Millenium of years, could pass by here,
without any notice at all
it's not the consuming that's needed
but the intended vessel's fall

Pass by this cup, my lovely,
it hasn't poison or food
it's waiting for the right person
to execute the correct mood

We were not warned about this
it's as natural as being asleep
to drink something when it is offered
then drift off into the deep

Down into dreams, we must go then,
to follow the path of the muse
it will not really mean danger
but lift us in a long fuse

Beware, short bursts of explosions,
and interruptions galore
we've sailed in this walnut sailing vessel,
to the moon and back before.

So drink hearty, my good maties,
it's an adventure we're heading for
You'll need strong fortifications
and courage to get to the door.

Release you, we will my maties,
when death rings the bell,
the blue cup will be empty,
and, your life will have gone well.

By

Writing by Regina Stemberger

Photo "Sleep is a symptom of caffeine deprivation" by Francis Mayne

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